CLEANING, FOXING, MOULD AND STAINING

If discolouring or staining have occurred, whether from a spillage, moisture in the air causing foxing (rusty brown spots), water damage, mould or discolouring fro mounts containing acid, it can be carefully “washed”, treated and returned back to the original colour of the paper, without harming the actual artwork.

TEARS AND HOLES

A tear to a watercolour or work on paper can initially seem catastrophic, but our conservation team can work their magic and repair any rips, tears or holes using liquid paper pulp or lining with Japanese tissue, then with careful pigment-matching create an invisible repair.

FOLDED AND CREASED ARTWORK

Folded or creased artwork can cause damage leading to unsightly crease marks, cracks or flaking paint. Our team use treatments including heat, humidity and weight pressure to reverse the creasing, then clean if necessary, followed by re-touching of any missing areas.

INSECT DAMAGE

Insects such as worms and silverfish are often a problem with watercolours and works on paper. Different insects can affect artwork in different ways, often going un-noticed until there is extensive damage or a complete infestation. Our team will decontaminate and treat the artwork and frame to eradicate any remaining insects and eggs. Any missing or eaten areas are repaired with Japanese tissue or liquid paper pulp. The repaired areas are then re-touched to give a flawless finish.

How much will my artwork restoration cost?

  1. How do I remove the brown spots that have appeared on my watercolour?

    These rusty patches are called foxing, without treatment, they will get worse and cause damage to the artwork. It will need to be professionally treated using specific washing treatments and conservation-standard bleaching agent, without affecting the paper or pigments.

  2. My watercolour has been ripped, can it be repaired?

    It’s understandable to assume nothing can be done, but our clever team can carefully fix the tear by filling the damaged areas with liquid paper pulp and lining with Japanese tissue, the result is seamless.

  3. Silverfish are eating by watercolour, can it be fixed and saved?

    Yes, we can treat the artwork and frame to get rid of any silverfish and eggs, then the damage can be repaired using liquid paper pulp, lining with Japanese tissue and retouching if necessary. We suggest the artwork is framed and the back of the frame is sealed to prevent the creepy-crawlies from getting inside. It should be stored or hung in a dry room. Try to avoid humid areas and keep the artwork off the floor, as concrete floors and skirting boards are a favourite hangout of silverfish.

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